Gulf Coast seafood biz slammed by freshwater from floods

FILE- In this May 10, 2019 file photo, workers open bays of the Bonnet Carre Spillway, to divert rising water from the Mississippi River to Lake Pontchartrain, upriver from New Orleans, in Norco, La. It will be months before state officials know whether losses from floods and spillway openings qualify Louisiana as a fisheries disaster. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries officials say floods began around November 2018, and a full 12 months' data is needed to compare to averages for the previous 5 years. The governors of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama asked months ago for US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to declare a fisheries disaster, making federal grants available to affected people. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
FILE - In this May 20, 2010 file photo, a shrimp boat carrying oil collection booms anchors for the night in Gulf of Mexico off the Mississippi River delta south of Venice, La. It will be months before state officials know whether losses from floods and spillway openings qualify Louisiana as a fisheries disaster. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries officials say floods began around November 2018, and a full 12 months' data is needed to compare to averages for the previous 5 years. The governors of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama asked months ago for US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to declare a fisheries disaster, making federal grants available to affected people. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
FILE - In an April 8, 2011 file photo, Dave Cvitanovich, an oysterman who has worked the waters of Louisiana his whole life, works on his boat at one of his oyster beds in Bay Jimmy in Plaquemine's Parish, La. His oysters were damaged by the fresh water diversion program by the state of Louisiana. It will be months before state officials know whether losses from floods and spillway openings qualify Louisiana as a fisheries disaster. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries officials say floods began around November 2018, and a full 12 months' data is needed to compare to averages for the previous 5 years. The governors of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama asked months ago for US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to declare a fisheries disaster, making federal grants available to affected people. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
FILE - In an Aug. 16, 2010 file photo, shrimpers haul in their catch in Bastian Bay, near Empire, La., on the first day of shrimping season.It will be months before state officials know whether losses from floods and spillway openings qualify Louisiana as a fisheries disaster. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries officials say floods began around November 2018 and a full 12 months' data is needed to compare to averages for the previous 5 years. The governors of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama asked months ago for US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to declare a fisheries disaster, making federal grants available to affected people. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
FILE - In this May 10, 2019 file photo, workers open bays of the Bonnet Carre Spillway, to divert rising water from the Mississippi River to Lake Pontchartrain, upriver from New Orleans, in Norco, La. It will be months before state officials know whether losses from floods and spillway openings qualify Louisiana as a fisheries disaster. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries officials say floods began around November 2018, and a full 12 months' data is needed to compare to averages for the previous 5 years. The governors of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama asked months ago for US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to declare a fisheries disaster, making federal grants available to affected people. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

NEW ORLEANS — Fresh water from Midwestern floods has killed oysters along the coasts of three states and cost Mississippi half of its blue crabs.

The head of Mississippi's Department of Marine Resources says water that came through a Louisiana spillway killed 95 percent of the oysters in his part of the Mississippi Sound and fed toxic algae blooms. Joe Spraggins says seafood and tourism businesses have lost $120 million to $140 million.

The governors of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama asked months ago for U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross to declare a fisheries disaster. That designation would allow federal grants to those whose livelihoods were affected.

Alabama canceled its oyster season.

A Louisiana fisheries official says it will be months before he has all the figures needed to say which fisheries qualify.

You may also interested in

US agency studies how to detect algae bloom...

Aug 13, 2016

U.S. Geological Survey scientists spent this week studying how nutrient levels contribute to algae...

Incumbent US Sen. Brian Schatz wins Hawaii primary

Aug 14, 2016

Incumbent U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz wins the Democratic primary and is likely to keep his seat in...

Great Lakes no help for a struggling Trump on...

Aug 15, 2016

Donald Trump needs a place to reset the electoral map, and he seems to be looking at the industrial...

Tesla: Removal of 'Autopilot' from Chinese site a...

Aug 15, 2016

Tesla says the term "Autopilot" was mistakenly removed from the electric car maker's website for...

Ford to invest $75M in autonomous vehicle sensor...

Aug 16, 2016

Ford and Chinese search engine company Baidu will invest $75 million each in Velodyne, a company...

The Next Daily is the new generation of online publication, serving you the most recent discoveries made in science and technology on a daily basis. At The Next Daily, we believe in the power of consistent and reliable reporting to inspire and move mankind forward.

Contact us: sales[at]thenextdaily.com