Native American group seeks to slow Alamo church renovation

Raynadia Thomas, left, and Diane Uriegas hold county and city proclamations during a news conference by members of the Native American community in front of the U.S. Postal Service building across the Alamo, Monday, Oct. 14, 2019 in San Antonio. A Native American group is calling on officials to slow down the renovation of the Alamo church in San Antonio, after archaeological reports showed human remains were found at the property. (Jerry Lara/The San Antonio Express-News via AP)
Ramon Vasquez, executive director of American Indians in Texas at the Spanish Colonial Missions, addresses the media during a news conference by the U.S. Postal Service building across the Alamo, Monday, Oct. 14, 2019 in San Antonio. A Native American group is calling on officials to slow down the renovation of the Alamo church in San Antonio, after archaeological reports showed human remains were found at the property. (Jerry Lara/The San Antonio Express-News via AP)
Alexis Reyes, left, and Anna Casta–eda participate in a news conference by members of the Native American community in front of the U.S. Postal Service building across the Alamo, Monday, Oct. 14, 2019 in San Antonio. A Native American group is calling on officials to slow down the renovation of the Alamo church in San Antonio, after archaeological reports showed human remains were found at the property. (Jerry Lara/The San Antonio Express-News via AP)
Alexis Reyes joins other members of the Native American community during a news conference by the U.S. Postal Service building across the Alamo, Monday, Oct. 14, 2019 in San Antonio. A Native American group is calling on officials to slow down the renovation of the Alamo church in San Antonio, after archaeological reports showed human remains were found at the property. (Jerry Lara/The San Antonio Express-News via AP)
Antonio Diaz, founder of the Texas Indigenous Council, addresses the media during a newss conference by the U.S. Postal Service building across the Alamo, Monday, Oct. 14, 2019 in San Antonio. A Native American group is calling on officials to slow down the renovation of the Alamo church in San Antonio, after archaeological reports showed human remains were found at the property. (Jerry Lara/The San Antonio Express-News via AP)

SAN ANTONIO — A Native American group is calling on officials to slow down the renovation of the Alamo church in San Antonio, after archaeological reports showed human remains were found at the property.

The Tap Pilam Coahuiltecan Nation filed a federal lawsuit last month seeking to halt the $450 million makeover of the sacred shrine that's on track to be completed by 2024. The San Antonio Express-News reports the group wants a say in what happens to unearthed human remains because many group members are descendants of people who lived near the site.

Ramón Vásquez, an executive member of Tap Pilam, said Monday on Indigenous People's Day that the discovery of bones and bone fragments validate his group's concerns.

Officials haven't commented on the discovery of human remains because litigation is pending. The Texas Historical Commission has filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit.

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