The Latest: Ban assault weapons, civil rights activist says

FILE - In this June 25, 2013 file photo, Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., accompanied by fellow members of the Congressional Black Caucus express disappointment in the Supreme Court's decision on Shelby County v. Holder that invalidates Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Lewis worked for racial equality in Mississippi and across the South in the 1960s, and has been a U.S. congressman from Georgia since 1986. He returns to Mississippi Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, and is one of five people being honored for advancing civil rights. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
Ruby Bridges Hall, a Tylertown, Miss., native who faced threats and ostracism when she became the first black child to integrate a public school in New Orleans in 1960, speaks with reporters prior to the Friends of Mississippi Civil Rights gala Friday, Feb. 23, 2018 in Jackson, Miss., where she and four other civil rights veterans were honored. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

JACKSON, Miss. — The Latest on civil rights activists being honored in Mississippi (all times local):

8:15 p.m.

The woman who faced threats and harassment when she integrated a southern school as a child several decades ago says "the next civil rights movement" should be banning assault weapons.

Ruby Bridges Hall said Friday at a celebration of the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum that she is distressed by mass shootings at U.S. schools.

Then known simply as Ruby Bridges, she was 6 when she became the first African-American child to enroll in an elementary school in New Orleans in 1960. When she enrolled, some white parents withdrew their children. And she could only eat food brought from home because someone threatened to poison her.

Hall is a native of Tylertown, Mississippi. She is one of five civil rights activists being honored at a gala Friday in the capital city of Jackson. It is part of a celebration of the civil rights museum, which opened in December.

____

11:09 p.m.

Longtime U.S. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia is one of five people who are going to be honored for their work to advance civil rights.

The recognition will take place during a celebration of the new Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in Jackson.

Organizers have planned a gala for Friday and a symposium for Saturday.

Lewis was scheduled to speak at the museum's opening in December but canceled his appearance because Republican Gov. Phil Bryant invited President Donald Trump.

Lewis said Thursday that he's never met Trump, but couldn't be at an event with him because of the "unbelievable things" the president had said about African-Americans and Latinos.

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