The Latest: Some Hawaii residents leave as Kilauea spews ash

This Tuesday, May 15, 2018 photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows incandescence observed at Fissure 14 around 10:30 a.m. HST at Kilauea Volcano, in Hawaii. Pulsing, gas-rushing sounds could be heard coming from the crack. Yellow sulfur deposits appear on the crack margins. (U.S. Geological Survey/HVO via AP)
Ken McGilvray, of Keaau, Hawaii, golfs in Volcano, Hawaii as ash from the summit crater of Kilauea volcano rises in the background, Wednesday, May 16, 2018. McGilvray lives about 12 miles away from the area where homes from lava fissures are being destroyed, and he has friends from the Leilani Estates neighborhood staying with him after they evacuated. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
An aerial view of Hawaii's Kilauea East Rift zone and the Puna Geothermal Venture plant is seen, Wednesday, May 16, 2018. Earthquakes were damaging roads and buildings on Hawaii's Big Island on Wednesday as ash emissions streamed from Kilauea volcano. (Cindy Ellen Russell/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP)
This Wednesday, May 16, 2018, image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows lava spattering from an area between active Fissures 16 and 20 photographed at 8:20 a.m. HST, on the lower east rift of the Kilauea volcano, near Pahoa, Hawaii. Plumes range from 1 to 2 kilometers (3,000 to 6,000 feet) above the ground. Officials say some vents formed by Kilauea volcano are releasing such high levels of sulfur dioxide that the gas poses an immediate danger to anyone nearby. (U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
This Thursday, May 17, 2018 image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows a view of the ash plume resulting from an early morning explosion at Kilauea Volcano, in Hawaii. The volcano has erupted from its summit, shooting a dusty plume of ash about 30,000 feet into the sky. Mike Poland, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey, confirmed the explosion on Thursday. It comes after more than a dozen fissures recently opened miles to the east of the crater and spewed lava into neighborhoods. (U.S. Geological Survey/HVO via AP)
FILE - In this June 22, 2004 file photo, an offering to Pele, goddess of Hawaiian volcanoes, adorns the cliffs above the newest lava flow from Kilauea volcano as it enters the Pacific Ocean at dawn in Volcano, Hawaii. When residents of rural Hawaii neighborhoods where lava from Kilauea volcano has burned down or threatened to consume their homes, a name often comes up: Pele. Pele, known as the goddess of volcanoes and fire, is an important figure in Hawaiian culture. (AP Photo/David Jordan, File)
FILE - In this May 5, 2018 file photo, offerings of ti leaves, rocks and cans to the fire goddess Pele, lie in front of lava as it burns across a road in the Leilani Estates subdivision as an unidentified person takes pictures of the flow near Pahoa, Hawaii. When residents of rural Hawaii neighborhoods where lava from Kilauea volcano has burned down or threatened to consume their homes, a name often comes up: Pele. Pele, known as the goddess of volcanoes and fire, is an important figure in Hawaiian culture. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
This Wednesday, May 16, 2018, image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows sulfur dioxide plumes rising from fissures along the rift and accumulating in the cloud deck, viewed from the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory overflight in the morning at 8:25 a.m., HST near Pahoa, Hawaii. Plumes range from 1 to 2 kilometers (3,000 to 6,000 feet) above the ground. Officials say some vents formed by Kilauea volcano are releasing such high levels of sulfur dioxide that the gas poses an immediate danger to anyone nearby. (U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
This photo provided by U.S. Geological Survey shows the ash plume at the Kīlauea Volcano, taken from a Mauna Loa webcam on Thursday, May 17, 2018 in Hawaii. The volcano has erupted from its summit, shooting a dusty plume of ash about 30,000 feet into the sky. Mike Poland, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey, confirmed the explosion on Thursday. It comes after more than a dozen fissures recently opened miles to the east of the crater and spewed lava into neighborhoods. (U.S. Geological Survey/HVO via AP)
A plume of volcanic steam rises from the alignment of fissures in Hawaii's Kilauea East Rift zone, Wednesday, May 16, 2018. Earthquakes were damaging roads and buildings on Hawaii's Big Island on Wednesday as ash emissions streamed from Kilauea volcano. (Cindy Ellen Russell/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP)

PAHOA, Hawaii — The Latest on the summit eruption of Kilauea volcano on Hawaii's Big Island (all times local):

8:30 a.m.

The summit explosion of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano created booming sounds in the nearby town of Pahoa and resident Toby Hazel says she's had enough and is preparing to leave town.

Hazel said Thursday that it was "time to go" after the volcano sent an ash plume high into the sky following two weeks of lava eruptions from fissures that emerged on the flanks of the volcano.

In Hilo 30 miles (48 kilometers) from the volcano, Pua'ena Ahn says he has experienced labored breathing, itchy, watery eyes and some skin irritation as ash plumes intensified in recent days.

Hawaii County officials say the volcano's summit exploded at 4:17 a.m.

Some schools are closed following the explosion but there have been no additional evacuations.

About 2,000 people living near the fissures spitting lava had already been evacuated.

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7:30 a.m.

Some residents of Hawaii's Big Island say they didn't hear or feel the pre-dawn summit eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano that sent a plume of ash 30,000 feet (9,140 meters) into the sky.

Epic Lava tour operator John Tarson is an early-riser who was awake and says he only knew about it because an alert came in on his phone.

Aloha Junction Bed and Breakfast owner Robert Hughes says there were a few small earthquakes Wednesday but he heard nothing Thursday when the volcano erupted. He described Thursday so far as a "nice rainy day."

Hawaii County Civil Defense spokeswoman Kanani Aton said she spoke to several close family and friends who live in the nearby community of Volcano and that all slept through the eruption

Hawaii County officials say the volcano on the Big Island exploded at 4:17 a.m.

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6:17 a.m.

Residents who live in a nearby town are reporting light amounts of ash after a summit eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano.

Hawaii County officials say the volcano on the Big Island exploded at 4:17 a.m.

U.S. Geological Survey geophysicist Mike Poland says the explosion likely only lasted a few minutes.

Poland says ash accumulations are minimal and that trace amounts were expected near the volcano and on a nearby town, named Volcano.

About two hours later, Poland said the webcam view showed a dusty plume rising from the summit. It looked like it was a steam and ash plume.

___

6:10 a.m.

Hawaii's Kilauea volcano has erupted from its summit, shooting a dusty plume of ash about 30,000 feet into the sky.

Mike Poland, a geophysicist with the U.S. Geological Survey, confirmed the explosion on Thursday. It comes after more than a dozen fissures recently opened miles to the east of the crater and spewed lava into neighborhoods.

Those areas were evacuated as lava destroyed at least 26 homes and 10 other structures.

The crater sits within Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which has been closed since May 11.

Officials have said they didn't expect the explosion to be deadly as long as people remained out of park.

Kilauea is one of the world's most active volcanoes. An eruption in 1924 killed one person and sent rocks, ash and dust into the air for 17 days.

___

This version corrects that the explosion happened at about 4:17 a.m., not 6 a.m.

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